Selig not changing stance on replay, All-Star format

Baseball commissioner Bud Selig said Tuesday he remains opposed to expanding the use of replay in the sport. He also has no plans to change the format of the All-Star Game in which the winning league gains home-field advantage in the World Series.

"I talked to a lot of players, talked to a lot of fans, quite frankly there is little appetite for more instant replay," Selig told reporters (per AOL FanHouse) during a conference call to promote next week’s All-Star Game. "At this point in time I agree with that. I said I’d continue to review it and I will. … I think where we are now is a very good balance."

Selig again invoked tradition as one reason why he’s hesitant to introduce more technology. "We have it to a point where if you go any further, you are really changing the sport. I’m very concerned about that," he said. Baseball uses replay to settle disputes about home runs and whether batted balls are fair or foul.

As for the All-Star Game, Selig claims no MLB officials have heard complaints about the changes he made after the 2002 game ended in a tie.

"What [home-field advantage] has done is added excitement to this thing. It has marketed the sport. It has done everything we thought it would. It’s been even better. … Anything that takes our All-Star Game and increases the intensity, why would you change that? Of course we wouldn’t."

Baseball commissioner Bud Selig said Tuesday he remains opposed to expanding the use of replay in the sport. He also has no plans to change the format of the All-Star Game in which the winning league gains home-field advantage in the World Series.

"I talked to a lot of players, talked to a lot of fans, quite frankly there is little appetite for more instant replay," Selig told reporters (per AOL FanHouse) during a conference call to promote next week’s All-Star Game. "At this point in time I agree with that. I said I’d continue to review it and I will. … I think where we are now is a very good balance."

Selig again invoked tradition as one reason why he’s hesitant to introduce more technology. "We have it to a point where if you go any further, you are really changing the sport. I’m very concerned about that," he said. Baseball uses replay to settle disputes about home runs and whether batted balls are fair or foul.

As for the All-Star Game, Selig claims no MLB officials have heard complaints about the changes he made after the 2002 game ended in a tie.

"What [home-field advantage] has done is added excitement to this thing. It has marketed the sport. It has done everything we thought it would. It’s been even better. … Anything that takes our All-Star Game and increases the intensity, why would you change that? Of course we wouldn’t."

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