Piniella disputes Bradley’s take on his Cubs career

Responding to criticism from Mariners outfielder Milton Bradley, Cubs manager Lou Piniella told the Chicago Tribune that the team never tried to turn Bradley into a power hitter in 2009.

"We never put any expectations on Milton," Piniella said. "I don’t really have anything else to add to that. … I think getting off to a struggling start didn’t help him. … I think he tried to make up for it with one swing of the bat."

Earlier this week, Bradley told The New York Times that the Cubs tried to turn him into something he wasn’t. "I never hit more than 22 homers in my career, and all of a sudden I get to Chicago and they expect me to hit 30. It doesn’t make sense. History tells you I’m not going to hit that many. Just a lot of things that try to make me a player I’m not."

And Bradley didn’t stop there, saying there was no communication in Chicago and that he was disrespected there.

"Two years ago, I played and I was good," Bradley told The New York Times. "I go to Chicago, not good. I’ve been good my whole career. So, obviously, it was something with Chicago, not me."

Bradley hit .257 with 12 homers and 40 RBIs for the Cubs last season and was suspended by the team for the final two weeks of the season because of his conduct. He was traded to Seattle in the offseason.

Responding to criticism from Mariners outfielder Milton Bradley, Cubs manager Lou Piniella told the Chicago Tribune that the team never tried to turn Bradley into a power hitter in 2009.

"We never put any expectations on Milton," Piniella said. "I don’t really have anything else to add to that. … I think getting off to a struggling start didn’t help him. … I think he tried to make up for it with one swing of the bat."

Earlier this week, Bradley told The New York Times that the Cubs tried to turn him into something he wasn’t. "I never hit more than 22 homers in my career, and all of a sudden I get to Chicago and they expect me to hit 30. It doesn’t make sense. History tells you I’m not going to hit that many. Just a lot of things that try to make me a player I’m not."

And Bradley didn’t stop there, saying there was no communication in Chicago and that he was disrespected there.

"Two years ago, I played and I was good," Bradley told The New York Times. "I go to Chicago, not good. I’ve been good my whole career. So, obviously, it was something with Chicago, not me."

Bradley hit .257 with 12 homers and 40 RBIs for the Cubs last season and was suspended by the team for the final two weeks of the season because of his conduct. He was traded to Seattle in the offseason.

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